From the mystical to the pseudo-scientific, people have been exploring the potential benefits of playing music to plants for decades, if not longer. Supposedly stimulating growth through vibrations, many have claimed that playing everything from heavy metal to classical have had a positive effect on their plants. Whether playing Slayer to your rubber tree will actually help it to photosynthesise remains to be seen, but it’s a nice idea.

Armed with a green thumb, a local group of artists and selectors are set to descend on an undisclosed location in South East London tomorrow for what’s being described as “Plant Party.” Experimental and ambient live performances will soundtrack the upstairs, with DJs rolling out an eclectic selection of groovers and techno cuts below as the Plantlife crew indulge a collective love of incense and foliage. Ahead of the horticultural extravaganza, we asked them each to pick a song they use to serenade their favourite potted plant.

Plantlife takes place tomorrow (October 21st) – more details here.


1. Rully Shabara – The Experience Series

Fred says: Every night i play this to my aloe veras. Shabara’s voice is something of a new age aphrodisiac and my plants are really into it.

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2. AllFeelings – SONNE, MOND UND STERNE

SiRo The Dracaena says: Esteemed plant-o-logist Sir Jagadis Chandra Bose’s studies have proven beyond reasonable doubt that playing music to your plants is good for their vertical expulsion. In my own field studies I found certain genres work best for certain plants. Scottish thistles responded extremely positively to donk, and one of my Daffodils became obsessed with the new DJ Normal 4 EP. Ultimately, across the board I found that slowly budding wonky techno timbres worked best for most plants wellbeing like this one from AllFeelings.

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3. Asha Puthli – Mr Moonlight

Doppelate says:  I simply love playing this one to my plants.  The trumpets sound so nutritious with Asha Puthli’s vocals.  My yucca has actually started to learn the words and sometimes we sing the chorus together on weekday nights.  It has a deep voice (for a plant) which makes it particularly beautiful.

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4. Olof Dreijer – Echoes from Mamori

Moonbow says: Recommended for the Echinodorus amazonicus, because OBVIOUSLY it is very frequently found in the Amazon but it’s also an underwater plant which makes it extra fun. Humidity level, wetter and damper than the rising sun. If I was an Amazonian plant, I’d consider it to be a pretty adequate homage to myself.

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5. MR TC – Soundtracks for Strangers

Jay likes to play this one to her kitchen basil plants.

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6. Ben Barrett – Some Of Them Were Flying

Mali puts this on whilst he trims his bonsai tree.

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7. Nadja – Sky Burial

Ellen says: So, although plants don’t have nervous systems it’s becoming increasingly noticed by scientists that they respond to all sorts of things, and it’s not far fetched to assume that a kind of relationship with vibration is going to be they way they’d ‘hear’ things. I wanted to pick something that would be very vibratory for them, plus long as I feel like their lifestyle of sitting in one place is going to make their time different to ours.

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8. RoodFood’s ‘Songs to Play to Your Houseplants’ exclusive!

RoodFood says: “I have two house plants and they are both very happy.”

RoodFood made us an exclusive track for readers to play to their plants. You can download it here.

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9. Balinese Monkey Chant – Baraka

Ottolenghi says:

God moves in a mysterious way,

His wonders to perform,
He plants his footsteps in the sea,
And rides upon the storm.

Read more here.

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10. Alex & Digby – Get Straight

Plant says: I’m a real talking plant and absolutely not a conceit to cover up the fact we ran out of artists to suggest tracks for this list. As a plant I absolutely love photosynthesising to Alex & Digby tracks. This 10-minute unassuming slugger aptly titled ‘Get Straight’ gives me all the motivation I could possibly need to do my stem strengthening exercises and maintain good posture in preparation for the winter months ahead.

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